Solar power: how much does it cost Ontario?

Solar: it costs plenty, too and has environmental "downsides" [Photo: IESO]
Solar: it costs plenty, too and has environmental “downsides” [Photo: IESO]
December 12, 2016

Earlier I deal with the question: “How much is wind power really costing Ontario?” Since then many have asked the same question about solar.

The actual generation of solar power is much harder to pin down on an hourly, daily, weekly or monthly basis as most of it is LDC (local distribution company) connected (DX), and the IESO (Independent Electricity System Operator) doesn’t report it.

There appears to be only a single report, “Ontario’s System-Wide Electricity Supply Mix: 2015 Datawhere one can find solar information. That report is from the Ontario Energy Board and only produced annually. The OEB report for 2015 (dated July 21, 2016) doesn’t provide actual generation; instead it gives a percentage of its contribution (grid-connected and LDC-embedded) to total generation which then can be utilized to determine solar contribution to the supply mix. First, one must determine, via IESO, what actual generation was from all sources in Ontario.

The OEB report for 2015 indicates solar (grid-connected plus embedded) contributed 1.9% to Ontario’s total generation of 153.7 terrawatts (TWh). The 1.9% noted by the OEB would suggest combined generation for grid and LDC connected solar was 2.92 TWh for 2015.

The average price paid for solar (roof-top and ground mounted) is approximately $448.00/MWh or $448 million per TWh — that means the 2.92 TWh generated in 2015 cost ratepayers about $1.3 billion.

Not environmentally perfect

Unlike wind power projects, solar installations don’t appear to suffer a requirement to ensure either their decommissioning or recycling; the cost of either (or both) will presumably be a burden that eventually falls to taxpayers. A National Geographic article from November 2014, “How green are those solar panels, really?” had this to say: “As the world seeks cleaner power, solar energy capacity has increased sixfold in the past five years. Yet manufacturing all those solar panels, a Tuesday report shows, can have environmental downsides.”

When Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault recently suspended LRP II (the second phase of Large Renewable Procurement), trade association CanSIA (Canadian Solar Industries Association) expressed their disappointment: “…it represents a significant back-step from previously committed renewables procurement in the Province that we believe will be required to deal with supply and GHG emission risks, such as delayed nuclear refurbishment schedules, un-met conservation targets, or increased demand as a result of electrification to meet the province’s climate change targets.”

Needless to say, Ontario’s ratepayers were not disappointed. We would like to see Minister Thibeault fully “cancel” both LRP II and contracts awarded under LRP I, and any other contracts that have missed their agreed start dates.

13% of the costs for 1.9% of the power

The $1.3 billion for 1.9% of solar generation represents approximately 13% of the 2015 total Global Adjustment pot of $9,962.6 million and drives electricity costs up by almost $1 billion annually.

Further installations of solar generation in the latter part of 2015 and throughout 2016 such as the 100-MW Kingston Solar on 1,000 acres of land will add to the generation costs, increase our surplus generation, and further drive up the cost of electricity for ratepayers.

Parker Gallant

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4 thoughts on “Solar power: how much does it cost Ontario?”

  1. Thanks for your continued efforts to hold our government to account for the untenable situation they have placed us all in. Also thanks for the good data you have managed to glean.

    Needless to say, Ontario’s ratepayers were not disappointed. We would like to see Minister Thibeault fully “cancel” both LRP II and contracts awarded under LRP I, and any other contracts that have missed their agreed start dates.

    It’s been suggested that the government could renegotiate contract prices as they wish but I find that hard to believe. What are the terms of existing LRPI contracts? If that’s too difficult to answer in specifics, what’s your best guess as to average contract duration and price guarantees for the duration? Is there any standard buyout clause?

    Like

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