Comparing Ontario Covid-19 Lockdowns in Reducing Electricity Demand

Earlier this year IESO released their 2020 stats and noted Ontario’s electricity demand fell 2.1% (down 2.9 terawatt hours [TWh]) from 2019 or about what 325,000 average households would consume in a year.

In 2020 the first full lockdowns in Ontario started in late March and basically stayed in place until late June/early July when some relief was allowed.  The current year’s lockdown looks very similar!  So, did the 2021 lockdowns result in further consumption reductions compared to the same quarter in 2020?

As it turns out consumption in the current April, May, June quarter saw a jump of 1.4 TWh compared to the same three months of 2020. That 1.4 TWh increase (up 4.7%) represents what 625.000 average Ontario households would consume in three months.  Ontario’s ratepayers consumed 29.724 TWh in the three months of 2020 and in 2021 consumption jumped to 31.130 TWh.

The GA (global adjustment) for 2021 totaled $2.687 billion and adding the average of the HOEP (hourly Ontario energy price) of $15.50/MWh for the three months brings the total cost to Ontario’s ratepayers and taxpayers (taxpayers are now picking up a large portion of the electricity costs) to $3.169,5 billion! The latter total indicates an average cost of approximately 10.2 cents/kWh (kilowatt hour) with the math simply being: $3.169,5 billion divided by consumption of 31.130 TWh.

The GA for 2020 was considerably higher as the Ford government capped the GA at $115/MWh (megawatt hour) due to the concern it would spike, so it totaled $3.825,7 billion and coupled with the average HOEP (average $8.10/MWh for the three months) brought the total cost to $4.066,4 billion.  That means the cost per kWh in 2020 for the same three months looks to be about 13.7 cents/kWh.

So, one should wonder, why the drop in average costs if consumption increased 4.7%?  

Well as it turns out our net exports (exports minus imports) declined 2.9 TWh so in 2021 that decline saved Ontarians about $425 million for those three months as we didn’t have to eat the GA of $115/MWh and the average HOEP (the sale price) was higher (up $7.40/MWh) so in 2021 we got a little more for each MWh we sold.  Additionally, curtailed wind declined by 183K MWh* saving us another $22 million.  I suspect we also didn’t spill as much hydro or steam-off nuclear which would also have reduced 2021 costs but that information is not disclosed as yet.  Less solar generation in 2021 may also have played a role at reducing costs.

It becomes obvious Ontario’s grid; supplied principally with nuclear and hydro supplemented by gas generation would produce lower costs. For all of 2020 nuclear and hydro supplied 94.3% of Ontario demand and cheap and reliable gas easily supplied the balance.  The intermittent and unreliable supply of wind and solar at the exorbitant contracted 20-year rates does nothing to reduce emissions while burdening ratepayers and taxpayers with much higher costs. 

The three-month comparison highlights the mess created by the previous Liberal Government(s) under the leadership of the McGuinty/Wynne terms as Premiers of the Province and their enactment of the Green Energy Act coupled with those contracts signed with wind and solar generators during their time in power.

*Thanks to Scott Luft for tracking industrial wind generation and curtailment monthly.

Ontario gifts Michigan cheap energy as US state threatens Line 5

I was on Sauga Radio 960 AM at the invitation of Marc Patrone for his morning show on May 19, 2021. Our discussion was related to the cheap power we have been exporting to Michigan and other locations and Michigan’s threat to shut down Line 5.

You can listen to our chat starting at 1:22.18 of his show on the podcast here:

Podcasts

You can also listen to our discussions at NEWSTALK CANADA if you are a subscriber here:

https://newstalkcanada.com/?page_id=2527

Greenpeace Canada, York University Professor and OCAA Chair attack the Ford Government

The Doug Ford led Ontario government took almost three years since they were given the mandate to govern the province (decimating the Wynne led government) to recognize “renewable energy” is given preferential treatment by IESO (Independent Electricity System Operator)!  What they recently did was to state they would “repeal sections of the Electricity Act, 1998 and the Ontario Energy Board Act, 1998 that were introduced under the Green Energy and Green Economy Act, 2009 to promote and prioritize the development or renewable energy.”  They opened the comment time for 40 days commencing April 15, 2021.

The takeaway of the proposed changes was focused as: “Prioritizing renewable generation is no longer appropriate. Going forward, Ontario will ensure value for ratepayers by allowing all resources to compete to meet system needs.”  

As one would expect pushback from the eco-warriors started and Keith Stewart, Senior energy strategist at Greenpeace Canada (Stewart worked for Gerald Butts at WWF as Director, Climate Change) jumped! He was ticked with the proposed changes in regulations and expressed his distain via twitter:

Keith Stewart@climatekeithDoug Ford isn’t only screwing up the pandemic response. His latest climate move: Proposal to Eliminate Renewable Energy Requirements for Ontario’s electricity system#onpoli https://ero.ontario.ca/notice/019-3471 9:48 AM · Apr 25,

Many will recall Greenpeace lost it’s charitable status in 1999 after having operated as a charity since 1976. Revenue Canada “refused to recognize the new Greenpeace Environmental Foundation as a charity, saying its activities have “no public benefit” and that lobbying to shut down industries could send people “into poverty.” It appears Greenpeace continue wishing to “send people into poverty”, ignoring the governments proposed changes are specifically focused to;  “ensure value for ratepayers”.  

An interesting aside! Greenpeace Canada has evolved and created a new entity having charitable status from the Canada Revenue Agency with an “Effective date of status: 2020-09-02”. The new entity is Greenpeace Canada Education Fund (GCEF).

They claim GECF is: “Separate from the campaigning arm of Greenpeace, the Greenpeace Canada Education Fund invests in scientific research, education, and other activities aimed at raising awareness of the environmental issues that affect people in Canada and around the world.” It goes on to state; ”To maintain our independence and integrity, we never take money from governments or corporations. That means the Greenpeace Canada Education Fund relies on donations from individuals, foundations and other non-profit organizations to achieve our goals.” The foregoing echo the words from Greenpeace Canada’s website but a simple search noted Greenpeace Canada got two grants totaling $100K from the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada a division of the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change so it appears they will take money from governments!

It is also worth noting the new charity and Greenpeace Canada have the same address at 33 Cecil St., Toronto. The December 31, 2019 annual report for Greenpeace Canada claims they spent over $760K on “Public outreach and education” and almost $3 million on fundraising.  They must feel using the new entity will help them reduce “fundraising” expenses due to their ability to issue tax receipts meaning, taxpayers will pick up a good portion of the fundraising costs in the future. 

One should wonder why the CRA changed its mind?      

The other individual who jumped on the bandwagon to condemn the Ford government’s initiative was none other then Mark Winfield*, a York U Professor and former Program Director at Pembina. Joining him with “quotes” in an article posted on “The Energy Mix” was Keith Stewart and Jack Gibbons** of the OCAA (Ontario Clean Air Alliance). The article headline is capitalized and scarily states: “Ontario Creates ‘Innovation Wasteland’ with Latest Renewables Rollback, Critic Warns”.  Some of the scarier quotes from the three individuals in the article are: “allergy to renewable energy”, “evidence-free decision making”, “a political vendetta”, “a program of extermination”, etc. etc. Their concerns seem over the top and aimed at scaring the reader.

Ontarians, who have experienced huge electricity cost increases since the advent of the GEA however, seems oblivious to the unidentified author of the article and the three individuals quoted! Perhaps someone else pays their electricity bills or they have solar panels on their roof or simply, facts don’t matter to them! 

The facts were formerly presented by  Ontario’s Auditor General, Bonnie Lysyk in her December 2, 2015 report which stated: “Between 2004 and 2014, the Ministry issued two policy plans and 93 ministerial directives or directions that did not fully consider the state of the electricity market, did not take long-term effects fully into account and sometimes went against the OPA’s advice.”  The report further described the costs to Ontario’s ratepayers as follows! “In particular, the Global Adjustment fees, covering the excess payments to generators over the market price, cost consumers $37 billion during that period, and are projected to cost another $133 billion from 2015 to 2032.

Those eco-warriors who are dependent on our tax dollars are totally unconcerned about the plan to “ensure value for ratepayers” and instead are hell-bent on further destroying the Ontario and Canadian economies and the well-being of all Canadians!

The time has come to remove the charitable status of them all (including University Foundations)*** unless they dismiss the professors demonizing fossil fuels so they can appreciate what those in the private sector are burdened with!

* For more on Winfield and York University check out this article!

**More on Gibbons and the OCAA here!

***York University Foundation’s (registered charity) April 30, 2020 annual report indicates total revenue of $1.268 billion and a claim that $1.095 billion of that was spent on “charitable activities”.

What Caught my Eye this Past Week or so!

Not sure if it’s the lock-down or just a normal week but a few things caught my eye because they seemed out of place and interesting.  Here they are!

Russia to Offer Carbon Credits With Far East Digital Forest Platform

I happened to read an article in the Moscow Times (credited to Bloomberg) claiming, “Russia is creating a digital platform to collect satellite and drone data on its vast forests in the Far East with the aim of offering them on the carbon offset market.” What that implies iswhen it launches later in 2021, will allow the government to lease sections of forest to enterprises, which can then invest in planting new trees or protecting existing ones.” 

What came to mind after reading the article is the opportunity something similar could do for Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau who promised that young Swedish “climate change” warrior, Greta Thunberg, he would plant 2 billion trees. The answer to his prayers perhaps, as he has been far too busy at his Rideau cottage to actually plant anything since the pandemic broke. He could also unleash the same concept on Canadian businesses to do what the Russian’s propose as between the Federal and Provincial governments about 89% of the land (almost 8.9 million square kilometers) in Canada is owned by either the Federal or Provincial governments.  He will just have to tell them where to plant the trees.

The other thing that struck me was as Canada’s forests are the 2nd largest (347 million hectares versus Russia’s 763 million) in the world why not make the same claim they did!  Russia claims their forests absorb 38% of their emissions so, based on that premise; Canada’s forests would be absorbing about 140 million tonnes which would bring us very close to our 2030 emissions target.  The Trudeau led government has increased the carbon tax imposed on all Canadians to $170/tonne by the time 2030 arrives so, adopting Russia’s concept would allow them to cancel future “carbon tax” increases.  Yahoo!

IESO Board Determination on a Market Rule Amendment

The second thing that caught my eye came from Ontario’s IESO (Independent Electricity System Operator).  IESO manage Ontario’s electricity grid doing what they can to ensure we are not impacted by brownouts or blackouts as Texas recently experienced. IESO announced: “A market rule amendment proposal to limit the IESO indemnity to losses caused by gross negligence, subject to the current limitations on recoverable damages, was adopted by the IESO Board of Directors and is currently planned to take effect on May 3, 2021.”  

Outward appearances suggest should events (blackouts) similar to what happened in Texas occur in Ontario, IESO want to limit potential lawsuits to actions proving “gross negligence” only!  ERCOT, the Texas grid operator is facing many huge lawsuits due to the winter storm the week of February 14, 2021 so presumably this is what inspired IESO to amend this Market Rule.

 Ontario should follow the recent Texas lead

Texas’s political leaders have reflected on the recent blackout and about two weeks ago, the Texas Senateunanimously approved a bill that would slap fines of up to $1 million a day against electricity and natural gas companies that balk at weatherizing facilities and would set up a system for warning the public about the risk of impending blackouts similar to one now used for hurricanes.”

As one would expect the renewable energy crowd, big tech and the financial institutions are upset about the bill but it appears to be a great idea following the review on the causes of the blackout. 

While Ontario’s electricity system is fully weatherized, the precedents of the Texas bill do open up an interesting possible act here in Ontario.  What is suggested is an act to reduce our costs of electricity!  Our Minister of Energy, Northern Development and Mines, Greg Rickford should consider an act penalizing renewable energy generating surplus electricity during low demand times such as the middle of the night or on weekends.  That surplus energy creates huge losses as IESO are forced to sell or curtail our surpluses (to avoid blackouts) to NY, Michigan, etc. at very low rates which are subsidized by Ontario ratepayers. Those events cause Ontario’s ratepayers to pay considerably more than $1 million a day. Here is an opportunity to reduce those ratepayer/taxpayer costs but let’s up the costs to generators to $5 million per day!

The time has come for Minister Rickford to act and deliver on the promise to reduce electricity rates by the 12% we were told would happen should the Ford led OPC party be elected. Here is the chance for them to prove they meant what they promised to those who voted for them!

Some good news on electricity costs

The foregoing title is a little deceptive as when Marc Patrone and I were speaking this morning on his show at Sauga Radio 960 AM we also covered a fair amount of other ground. Some of the other topics discussed were short spurts about pipelines, China, Russia’s forests and even briefly about housing costs. You can listen to our full discussion on the podcast starting at 41:10 and ending at 58:00 here:

or if you are a subscriber to NEWSTALK CANADA you can listen here:

https://newstalkcanada.com/?page_id=2527

Tom and guest Parker Gallant discuss the economics of “green” energy

Tom Harris invited me on his Exploratory Journeys podcast on i Heart radio and we spent about 1/2 hour discussing the economics related to “green” energy. We cover a fair amount of ground related to the electricity sector in Ontario particularly on the costs of renewable energy.

You can listen to the podcast with Tom Harris here but please note there are a couple of commercials before our chat:

Wow! January and February 2021 show declining Ontario electricity costs!

For the first time in a decade Ontario experienced a reduction in the costs of grid generated electricity for two months in a row so the question should be; who should we thank?

As it turns out the Ontario demand for electricity in the first two months of 2021 were actually up slightly (1.3%) from 2020 or just under 300,000 MWh (megawatt hours) and about what 200,000 average households would have consumed in two months.  The costs of generation for January 2021 including both the HOEP (hourly Ontario energy price) plus the GA (Global Adjustment) dropped from $116.24/MWh to $99.83/MWh and for February it dropped from $127.31/MWh to $82.94/MWh.

So, why did costs decline?                                                                                                                                              

Was it because the Ford led Government took action and passed an Act to reduce the rates paid to wind or solar* generators or the OEB (Ontario Energy Board) decreed they would reduce rates or because IESO (Independent Electricity System Operator) suddenly contracted for low-cost generation?

The answer is none of the above!  As it turns out we can thank “Mother Nature” for a big part of the cost reduction as wind generation fell by 17.2% or almost 438,000 MWh (what almost 300,000 households would consume in two month). That drop in output by those IWT (industrial wind turbines) saved $60 million in costs alone and additionally the slight increase in consumption noted above coupled with the fact that one of the Darlington nuclear units was shut down for refurbishment meant we had much less surplus generation that had to be sold to our neighbours in NY or Michigan.  Our net exports (exports less imports) sold in 2021 were only 1.007 TWh (terawatt hours) versus 2.694 TWh in 2020. The drop in sales of the surplus power of 1.687 TWh was also sold for a higher price (less suplus generation results in higher prices) which resulted in a reduction in our loss on those sales of $221.2 million year over year.  In 2020 the cost of our exports added $289.8 million to the costs of electricity but that cost dropped to $68.6 million in 2021 for those two comparative months.

To account for the reduced wind and nuclear generation Ontario’s natural gas plants stepped up to meet our needs generating an additional 522,000 MWh at prices reflecting only fuel costs and a small margin.  Most of those gas plants were added to ensure our grid reliability after the Green Energy Act was legislated back in 2009 and the OPA (Ontario Power Authority), since merged with IESO; contracted wind and solar generation they knew required backup due to their intermittent and unreliable nature.

No doubt the eco-warriors will be up in arms when they notice natural gas generation increased in January and February 2021.  Those eco-warriors should take a few moments to reflect on the fact that without electricity from natural gas generators many Ontarians may have died from the cold.

This is just another demonstration of the wasted cost Ontarians are continually forced to pay due to the GEA (Green Energy Act) and the contracts granted to wind and solar generators.

*Solar produces little power during the Ontario winter months and 2021 saw generation of only 0.071 TWh in January and February 2021 but it’s cost added about $32 million for very little generation.

The Ontario Liberal Electricity Legacy is Complicated

The Cost of Subsidizing Green Energy Contracts for Industrial and Large Commercial Ratepayers came from the Financial Accountability Office (FAO) of Ontario in a report issued March 18, 2021!  What it states is the upcoming three years (2021-2023) will burden taxpayers with a cost of $2.8 billion.

My take on that “burden” was an estimate of $3.8 billion in an article posted November 9, 2020 just days after the Provincial budget was released announcing the subsidy. I did note, at that time, my estimate was a “back of the envelope” calculation and several events have occurred since then affecting the cost estimates.  The FAO’s forecast is the cost is 2.2 times what the budget estimated it was going to be whereas my estimate was 2.9 times the budget number.

The FAO report goes into further detail suggesting out to 2040 “the renewable generation subsidy program will cost the Province a net total of $15.2 billion.” The latter is referenced in the FAO report as the “Net cost to the Province” as the report stated; if the current subsidy program remained in effect through to 2040 for all segments of electricity consumers the total cost would have been $38.6 billion plus a loss of $1.3 billion in HST.  What the recent amendments to the Ontario Electricity Rebate (OER) program did was reduce the “OER discount provided to residential, farm and small business ratepayers”, which resulted in a reduction of $24.7 billion in estimated costs over the 20 years.

No doubt many Ontario ratepayers will recall Ontario’s Auditor General, Bonnie Lysyk, in 2015 issued a report castigating the Ontario Liberal Party stating; “From 2006 to 2014, the electricity portion of the hydro bills of residential and small-business consumers increased by 70%. In particular, the Global Adjustment fees, covering the excess payments to generators over the market price, cost consumers $37 billion during that period, and are projected to cost another $133 billion from 2015 to 2032.”

That report from the AG was the bedrock used by the Ford led Ontario Conservative Party to make it a major issue during the leadup to the last provincial election and at that time they promised to reduce electricity rates by 12%.  We ratepayers are still waiting for that to happen!  With the advent of the relief provided by the province as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic our rates were reduced but the announcement from the OEB (Ontario Energy Board) on February 22, 2021 stated; “residential and small business customers will resume paying Time-of-Use (TOU) and Tiered pricing under the Regulated Price Plan (RPP) at prices that were set by the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) on December 15, 2020.”  To put the foregoing in context a look at TOU rates before the Ford government were elected and comparing them to those announced by the OEB discloses the 12% promise is a distant memory as we see the percentage increases in all three categories has jumped by a large multiple of the inflation rate as the following depicts!

Time of Use    March 2018    March 2021    % Increase
Off-peak              6.5/kWh            8.5/kWh           30.7%
Mid-peak            9.5/kWh           11.9/kWh          25.2%   
On-peak             13.2/kWh          17.6/kWh           31.8%       

The difference between then and now is simply that back then the Wynne led government was using taxpayer monies to provide relief via the “Fair Hydro Plan” which subsidized rates by 29% (based on my bill) whereas the Ford government is now using taxpayer dollars to provide a subsidy of almost 98% (based on my bill).  It’s simply a case of incurring taxpayer debt to subsidize ratepayers.  Instead of taking money from our after-tax pocket they are incurring it for future taxpayers to pay.

In an interview back in March 2020 Premier Ford in response to the question about why he hadn’t achieved the 12% reduction in electricity rates went on and used the phrase “it’s extremely complicated”.  That phase is very similar to the phrases used by former energy ministers such as Bob Chiarelli and Glen Thibeault as well as the current leader of the Ontario Liberal Party, Steven Del Duca. 

What is obvious from the foregoing is the time has arrived for someone/anyone with basic common sense be appointed to the Ministry and make a serious effort to uncomplicate it!

Perhaps it’s simply a pipe dream!

OPG’s on a roll and Ontario’s ratepayers and taxpayers are paying the price

OPG released their 2020 Annual Report about a week ago and despite profits increasing, during the pandemic, by $235 million (up 20.9%) from $1,126 million in 2019 to $1,361 million, the media didn’t seem to notice. Gross revenue, net of fuel costs, increased $1,118 million over 2019.  Based on total generation of 82.1 TWh, (up 5.5% over 2019) the cost to produce a MWh (net of fuel costs) jumped from $68.70 in 2019 to $78.72/MWh in 2020 for a 15.5% increase!

The increased gross revenue came from, nuclear, up $700 million, gas and other generation up $300 million and higher hydro costs of $40 million. The latter doesn’t include 4.3 TWh* of spilled hydro costing ratepayers about $220 million in 2020 nor does it include the “fuel costs” of water which were $347 million up slightly from 2019 despite a small drop (2 gigawatt hours [GWh]) of actual generation.

The increased revenue from nuclear and hydro came as a result of the OEB finally blessing rate increase applications submitted by OPG.  In the case of the nuclear rates the OEB took an inordinate amount of time to approve rate increases, so much of this jump was associated with some catching up by OPG as well as a slight increase (3 GWh) in actual generation. The jump in gas costs is due to the acquisition by OPG of the “portfolio of combined-cycle natural gas-fired plants in Ontario from TC Energy Corporation (TC Energy) for approximately $2.8 billion, inclusive of customary closing adjustments. The portfolio included the Napanee GS, the Halton Hills GS, and the remaining 50 percent interest in the Portlands Energy Centre.” As a result of the acquisition, OPG’s gas generation operations in 2020 represented 26.8% (2.6 TWh) of all grid connected gas generated (9.7 TWh) whereas in 2019 the 0.6 TWh they generated was only 6.3% of grid connected gas generation.  The acquisition didn’t close until the end of April 2020 so we should expect OPG will have an even larger percentage of gas generation in 2021.

It is worth noting OPG’s total generation of 82.1 TWh added to Bruce Nuclear’s generation of 44 TWh provided 95.4% of all grid connected Ontario demand in 2020. If one includes the 4.3 TWh of spilled hydro OPG was paid for and the 1 GWh of steamed off nuclear at Bruce the combination of the two could have provided 98.7% of Ontario’s grid demand.  The grid shortfall of 1.7 TWh could have been easily provided by OPG’s hydro units.  Without the costs of over $2 billion dollars for the 13 TWh generated by grid connected wind, solar and bio-mass generation, ratepayers and taxpayers would have been much better off.  Additionally as Scott Luft recently noted that surplus generation only served to reduce emissions for our neighbours in US states such as Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, etc.

Another point worth expounding on is, in addition to the water “fuel costs” of $347 million paid to the provincial government OPG is required to pay them what is referenced as PILT (payment in lieu of taxes). The PILT jumped up 103.9% from 2019 when they were $190 million to $387 million in 2020. So, the province received $734 million in 2020 from us ratepayers which should help to pay a good chunk of the estimated cost of $6.5 billion of the “Ontario Electricity Rebate” that now appears on our monthly hydro bills and is allocated to taxpayers.

While previous Ontario governments have made the electricity ministry as complex as possible the current Ford led government has gone on to exacerbate its complexity rather than trying to undo the mess!  It’s time they actually studied the sector and generate changes to simplify it and reduce the burden on ratepayers and taxpayers but perhaps that is too much to hope for!

*The 4.3 TWh of spilled hydro was equivalent to what almost 480,000 average households (over 10% of all Ontario households) consume annually.

This is what a kilowatt hour of electricity in Ontario REALLY costs

Our household just received the electricity bill from Hydro One and our consumption for the month dropped by 14% compared to the 2020 bill.  If one does the simple math on the latest bill, ie: total cost including taxes divided by consumption it suggests the cost per kWh (kilowatt hour) was 13.8 cents. Going through the same process for the 2020 bill produces a higher cost of 15.9 cents/kWh.

The foregoing year-over-year drop of 2.1 cents/kWh does not really represent a more efficient system, instead it is a reflection of the Ontario government’s move to “lock-down” all of us commencing December 26th due to an anticipated jump in Covid-19 cases.  Shortly after the “lock-down” the Ontario government instructed the electricity sector to only charge residential ratepayers 8.5 cents/kWh from January 1, 2021 for 28 days and subsequently extended that order for an additional 12 days.

The bills on page 1* from Hydro one in a separate little box in dollars and cents, provides what is referenced as “Total Ontario support”. For our household it worked out to 13.6 cents/kWh meaning collectively, the all-in cost per kWh consumed was 27.4 cents with 98.2% of that allocated to taxpayers.

Examining our bill for March 2011 indicated the full all-in cost at that time, was 12.5 cents/kWh. Compared to the recent bill with an all-in cost of 27.4 cents/kWh it represented an increase in 10 years of 119%.

To put the above in context, the OEB in their “Yearbook of Electricity Distributors” for 2019 indicated Ontario had almost 4.8 million residential ratepayers who, on average, consume 750 kWh monthly! In 2021 the all-in costs of one month’s consumption by those residential ratepayers was approximately $1,315.2 million whereas in 2011 it was about $600 million.  Over 12 months residential ratepayer all-in costs for 2011 were $7.2 billion. For 2021 all-in costs could amount to $15.8 billion shared by residential ratepayers and taxpayers.

What the increase of approximately $8.5 billion all-in costs to residential ratepayers/taxpayers over those 10 years represents are principally; the effects of the GEA. Those costs were added as industrial wind turbines and solar panels received 20 year contracts at above market prices over the first few years and then were built and added to the grid.  Lots of other spending under the GEA also increased costs with spending on; conservation, energy storage, rate class establishment containing cross subsidies, gas plant additions to back up the intermittent and unreliable nature of wind and solar etc etc. The gas plant costs include $1 billion of expenses to move two of them. A major scandal eventually evolved from the disclosure on the reason for the moves and the costs.

The Justin Trudeau led government seem to view the recent and very visible history of what happened in Ontario as one he and his party favour.  The outcome in Ontario should serve as a warning to the rest of Canada what happens when the government sees CO 2 reduction as the thermostat to control the climate!

Going green for electricity generation is very costly so get ready to pay up to charge your Tesla!

*Page 2 is the actual bill containing individual costs for kWh consumed, distribution costs, regulations costs, etc.