Wind power lobbyist spins numbers to its advantage

Too bad the facts show that actually, wind power isn’t needed in Ontario

Comber wind project with 72 turbines: add up ALL the costs for the truth

The trade association and lobbyist for the wind power development industry, the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA), loves to provide its audience with information that only shows them in a good light. Their audience, “environmental” organizations and gullible politicians are easily sold.

Once again CanWEA has put the spin out.

A recent short post is titled “A Canadian Success Story” and it claims “Wind energy met approximately 6 per cent of Canada’s electricity demand in 2017 – and more than that in jurisdictions such as P.E.I. (28 per cent), Nova Scotia (12 per cent), Ontario (8 per cent), Alberta (7 per cent) and New Brunswick (7 per cent).”

It is curious as to why CanWEA would have used 2017 as their “success story” as it was an expensive one for Ontario’s ratepayers. Wind generation, the curtailment of excess generation, the need for backup gas plants, and the inability of wind to deliver actual power when needed, all played a significant role in continuing to drive up costs for Ontario electricity consumers.

Power arriving on the grid when demand was low was a big factor in the creation of the Fair Hydro Plan by the former government. IESO reported grid-connected wind delivered 9.2 TWh (terawatt hours) which was only 6.4% of total grid-connected generation — not the 8% claimed by CanWEA. Another 3.3 TWh of wind generation was curtailed in 2017 which added costs.

The 9.2 TWh delivered to the grid cost ratepayers $1,242 million and the 3.3 TWh curtailed added another $396 million, bringing the total cost of wind generation to Ontario’s ratepayers to $1.638 billion or 17.7 cents/kWh! If spilled hydro of 6 TWh and 1 TWh of steamed-off nuclear caused by wind due to surplus baseload generation (SBG) conditions, their costs of about $330 million bring the total cost of wind generation to $1.968 billion. And that is without gas plant idling costs for when wind is absent.

The total costs for all grid-supplied electricity in 2017 amounted to approximately $16 billion. So, the cost of wind power generation, along with the wasted hydro and nuclear, represented about 12.3% of all costs for 6.4% of their grid-accepted generation. If costs of our exports were included, wind generation effects on our electricity bills would be even higher. In 2017, nuclear and hydro supplied 97.1% of Ontario’s demand; with the spilled (wasted) hydro of 6 TWh and the 1 TWh of steamed-off nuclear, they could have supplied 102%.

In other words, wind wasn’t needed.

Scanning stats for a couple of months in 2018 shows that during the hot and high demand summer months of July and August, wind generation does what it generally does — falls flat. Data supplied by Scott Luft and the IESO monthly summaries shows wind provided only 4% of Ontario’s demand in July and 4.4% in August. In May 2018, a low demand month, grid-connected wind supplied 5.7% of Ontario demand. It could have supplied 9.1%, but almost 40% of what it could have generated was curtailed due to the month’s low demand.

What this all demonstrates, again, is the intermittency and unreliability of power from wind turbines. Wind power forces ratepayers to simply hand out money without any benefit.

Our politicians need to recognize spin when they see it, and understand that wind turbines provide almost no value in reducing emissions, or providing a reliable supply of electrical power.

PARKER GALLANT

 

Cutting Ontario’s electricity bills: promise made, promise (partly) kept

How the Ford government is cutting electricity costs, and some suggestions on how they might do better

A month or so before the 2018 Ontario election, the Ontario PC Party made a promise to reduce electricity bills for Ontario’s residential ratepayers by 12% or specifically: “Putting $173 back in the taxpayer pocket”.  The amount needed to achieve the $173 per ratepayer would amount to approximately $807 million annually, based on the 4,665,055 residential ratepayers Ontario had at the end of 2017, according to the OEB’s (Ontario Energy Board) “2017 Yearbook of Electricity Distributors”.

PC leader Doug Ford promised if elected, they would give ratepayers the dividends the government receives from the partially privatized Hydro One. For 2018, that would amount to $245 million as 47.4% (the province’s current ownership) of total dividends ($518 million) awarded to common shareholders by Hydro One.  The dividends of $245 million annually would translate to about $53 per residential ratepayer.

On July 13, 2018, the Minister of Energy, Northern Development and Mines announced the cancellation of 758 renewable energy contracts* which he said would save ratepayers $790 million over the life of the contracts. Assuming the bulk of the contracts were for 20-year terms, that would amount to about $40 million annually, costs that would have been borne by all ratepayers, not just “residential” ones.

Over the past several years, residential ratepayers consume about 32% of all grid-delivered electricity, so the savings to that group should be relatively small as 32% of $40 million only translates to annual savings of $13 million (rounded) or less than $3.00 per residential ratepayer. (Bob Chiarelli, when Minister of Energy would have suggested it would amount to “a large Timmies”.)

So, these two actions leave a shortfall of slightly more than $545 million or $117 per residential ratepayer — where will the balance come from?

Will “bold action” pay out the shortfall for ratepayers?

March 21, 2019 arrived and the Ministry of Energy, Northern Development and Mines issued a press release declaring: “Ford Government Taking Bold Action to Fix Hydro Mess.” It was full of promises, but were they enough to deliver the missing $117/per residential ratepayer?

Winding down the Fair Hydro Plan (FHP)

The press release specifically stated the Ministry would “wind down the Fair Hydro Plan” (FHP) and in the process save billions of dollars in borrowing costs.  They would do that by simply moving the borrowing process from the OPG “Trust” directly to the Province.  As noted in the report of the FAO (Financial Accountability Office) of early 2017, borrowing via the “Trust”, would increase interest costs by “about $4 billion in interest expense, because the interest rate on Provincial debt is lower than the interest rate on OPG Trust’s debt.”  The FAO noted the timeline required to both fund and repay the total debt under the FHP was 29 years, so the $4 billion in savings would amount to approximately $138 million annually.  As the FHP was all directed at residential ratepayers, $138 million would reduce future rate increases by $30 per residential ratepayer.

That reduces the missing $117 to $87 per ratepayer.

Reducing Conservation Spending

Another position in the recent press release was related to reducing conservation spending which has added about $450 million annually to ratepayer bills for the past 10 years.  The effect on residential ratepayers will be approximately one-third of that amount.  Those coupons your local distribution company handed out for the purchase of LED bulbs, and the rebates for installing energy efficient furnaces or air conditioners have been cancelled, which will reduce the bill to residential ratepayers by around $150 million annually.  The effect on ratepayers should be a reduction in future rate increases of $32 per residential ratepayer. So that means the $173 reduction is now $55!

Unanswered at this point is where the remaining $85 per residential ratepayer will come from. Perhaps Minister Rickford would like a suggestion or two to find the missing $400 million in annual costs needed to eliminate the missing $55 per residential ratepayer? Here we go.

Quick and easy savings                                                                                                                                                             Wyoming State has implemented a “wind tax” and a suggestion to do likewise in Ontario was put forward by the writer back in March 2018 as just one idea.  If that is seen by the current government as going “against the grain” of a conservative government, I have another suggestion which can be easily found in the regulatory pigeonholes!

Enforce the regulations

Enforcement of regulations dealing with complaints surrounding wind turbines would reduce the generation they provide out of sync with demand or where they are curtailing their generation, but paid for doing so.

Enforcing regulations should be something the government should be onside with!

A recent article noted: “The Ontario government now has records of thousands of complaints dating back to 2006 regarding excessive noise and shadow flicker or strobe effect. The detailed files on these complaints, which contain notes by Provincial Officers with the ministry of the environment, also contain comments on adverse health effects stemming from exposure to the noise emissions.”

Needless to say, those “complaints” have been virtually ignored. If the regulations were enforced wind developers would be told to shut down their turbines thereby saving ratepayers considerable monies and as a wondrous side benefit, would reduce health issues (and costs to the healthcare system) related to the noise and strobe effects.

The Minister of Energy, Northern Development and Mines would quickly find the $260 million missing to help him reach the goal set by Premier Ford to reduce future bills by the $55 per residential ratepayer.

One should hopefully believe (unlike Kathleen Wynne, our previous Premier), Doug Ford was not suggesting the $173 per residential ratepayer he promised will turn out to be a “stretch goal”!

PARKER GALLANT

*One wind power project, the 100-megawatt “Nation Rise” in North Stormont south of Ottawa, escaped the guillotine, despite not being built and in fact, receiving its approval after the election while the defeated Wynne government was in “caretaker mode.” Cancelling this project would save Ontario ratepayers over $400 million for the 20-year contract, less any penalty for cancelling the contract.

How Kathleen Wynne could have avoided public outcry over electricity costs

Former energy minister Thibeault and former premier Kathleen Wynne: no opinions wanted, thank you

Or, how she might have benefitted from listening to opinions (and saved Ontario millions)…

The following tweet from TVO reporter John Michael McGrath reflects the attitude of former Premier Kathleen Wynne to a question she was asked about an estimate of energy costs from yours truly:

 “John Michael McGrath‏ @jm_mcgrath                                                                                                           Tories introduce an estimate of energy costs from Parker Gallant, Wynne declines to comment on “one person’s opinion, one person’s research.”      10:20 AM – 3 Dec 2018”

The Select Committee on Financial Transparency questioning Wynne is/was attempting to determine the actual reason (e.g., hide debt and push the current cost of energy generation into the future) behind the creation of the Fair Hydro Plan (FHP) by the former Ontario Premier and her Cabinet.

Ontario is now one and a half years into the FHP which provides an opportunity to review the estimated costs of the 10 years of deferral by the Financial Accountability Office (FAO) of Ontario and see what has actually happened so far.

The FAO’s forecast estimated the deferral would cost $18.4 billion over 10 years plus another $21 billion for interest. The average monthly deferral (before interest costs) would therefore average $153 million.  Since the FHP first kicked in, IESO has posted monthly, what they call; the “Global Adjustment Modifier” (GAM) so, it is a relatively simple task to determine how the FAO’s estimates have played out, versus actual deferrals.

So far GAM deferrals (without interest costs) are $3,843 million for the 18 months — that’s about $770 per ratepayer. What that indicates is, the monthly average, so far, has been $214 million for the 17% of the GAM deferral versus the estimated $153 million in the FA0 forecast.  Should those averages continue for the next 10 years the deferred amount will be $25.7 billion or $5,140 per Class B ratepayer without interest costs. The additional $7.3 billion of the GAM deferral would also drive up interest costs to approximately $29 billion adding another $5,800 per ratepayer that would need to be repaid.

What that means is, future ratepayers could be on the hook for as much as $54.7 billion!

How could that $54.7 billion transfer to future ratepayers have been avoided?

The numbers are up in IESO’s website reflecting how much grid-connected wind power generation has been delivered for the first 9 months of the current year. My friend Scott Luft has provided the estimate of curtailed wind: the collective 8.98 TWh (terawatt hours)** translate to costs of $1,190.7 million. If one extrapolates the first nine months to a full year, the estimate of costs are $1,587.6 million for wind power.  IESO does not publish solar output (except for grid-connected) as most of solar is embedded within the distribution system.  Despite the lack of data, one can assume solar will have generated 15% of its capacity (380MW are grid-connected [TX] and 2,081 are distribution connected [DX]) meaning the 2,461 MW of capacity should generate approximately 3.23 TWh annually at an average cost of $448/MWh. That adds about $1,450 million to renewable’s costs.  Wind and solar together will therefore add $3.038 billion (rounded) annually to electricity costs assuming their capacity levels and annual generation remain at current levels.

As you can see, the estimated cost of wind and solar at $3.038 billion exceeds the adjusted annual GAM costs of $2.562 billion (18-month costs of $3,843 million/18 months X 12 months = $2,562 million) by $476 million.   At the same time TX- and DX-accepted wind (7.52 TWh) and solar (3.23 TWh) is assumed to come in at 10.75 TWh which presumably would need replacement.  In that regard the Ontario Power Generation 2018 3rd Quarter report indicates they spilled 2.4 TWh in the first nine months, which will probably transition to 3.2 TWh for the full year (ratepayers pay for spilled hydro so no additional costs) leaving a shortfall of just 7.55 TWh to be supplied to replace ALL wind and solar generation!

Without knowing, at this point, if nuclear generation had been steamed-off or exports could have been reduced, the question becomes: could gas plants*** have provided the 7.55 TWh (net after allowing for spilled hydro) wind and solar will probably provide for 2018?

Gas plants for the first nine months of 2018 generated 7.89 TWh; If extrapolated to 12 months, gas could generate 9.22 TWh and represent about 12.4% of its total capacity (8,500 MW). Adding another 7.55 TWh of generation would mean they would be required to operate at 22.5% of capacity so they could have easily replaced wind and solar generation.   The additional costs of that generation would be fuel costs plus a small mark-up.  Even if fuel costs and the mark-up were as much as $50/MWh the costs of the 7.55 TWh would amount to slightly less than $400 million.

What the foregoing suggests is that with no wind and solar generation, the costs of generation could have been reduced by $2,638 million (wind and solar costs of $3.038 billion less $400 million for additional gas generation of 7.55 TWh).

Coincidentally, the cost reduction of $2.638 billion per annum is remarkably close to the above noted GAM costs of $2.562 billion that will accumulate in the OPG Trust every year for the next 10 years along with the interest on that debt.

So, without wind and solar, former Premier Wynne might have avoided the public outcry about electricity costs and her party might have been re-elected.

Just “one person’s opinion, one person’s research”!

PARKER GALLANT

*Based on 5 million ratepaying households and Class B business consumers.                                                                   **Grid accepted: 7.52 TWh plus curtailed of 1.46 TWh = 8.98 TWh at a cost of $135/MWh for grid accepted and $120/MWh for curtailed.                                                                                                                             ***Gas plants are paid to idle at a rate as low as $4,200/MW per month (Lennox) to over $15,000/MW per month.

 

 

 

What did we get for billions spent on electricity in Ontario?

It’s not over: Ontario taxpayers and ratepayers will be paying for the past government’s mismanagement for years to come. Here’s how… and how much.

Ontario wind turbines at Belle River project

The last in a series on the IESO

August 2, 2018

The two earlier articles about Ontario Independent Electricity System Operator or IESO revealed the fact that it could be “gamed” — and in fact, it was! To the tune of $100 million, by just one generator.

Needless to say, any gaming by a local distribution company (LDC) also may be happening. Why would I suggest that?  When I asked the IESO why the Fair Hydro Plan “Variance” amount was so high for May 2018, they said this:

“Please note that settlement data submitted to the IESO by the LDCs is not audited by the IESO (audit responsibilities reside with the OEB) and is processed as submitted.”

The May “Variance” amount was $309.9 million. More disturbing is that the first six months of the current year has rung up $1.180 billion in the “Variance” which could represent $2.360 billion for 2018 if the last six months are similar.

The results to date of the FHP “Variance” amount is well in excess of the calculations presented by the Ontario Financial Accountability Office (FAO) in their review, which had the following note:

“Figure 3-3 summarizes the FAO’s estimate of the annual cost of the FHP through to 2045-46. The FAO estimates the cost of the FHP to the Province will peak at $1.8 billion in 2020-21, after which the FAO assumes that the electricity relief programs will no longer be funded by the Province. The HST rebate is forecast to cost $0.9 billion in 2021-22, rising rapidly to $1.6 billion by 2028-29”.

The average suggested by the FAO per year was $1.750 billion, so, at the current rate of accrual, future Ontario ratepayers may be looking at total of almost $9.5 billion (without including interest costs) added to our electricity bills.

Taxpayers will be affected too: They’ll have to bear the costs of lost revenue of about $4.1 billion (plus interest costs) associated with the HST rebate and another $3 billion associated with “Adjusting Electricity Relief Programs”. The latter includes the RRRP (Regulated and Remote Rate Program) the OESP (Ontario Electricity Support Program) and a new First Nations On-Reserve Delivery Credit and Affordability Fund.

So, the 17-percent reduction on our electricity bills, coupled with the HST foregone tax revenue plus the cost of those “Relief Programs” represents $16.6 billion of spending, without interest costs.

What are we getting for $16B?

What are we getting for that $16.6 billion? No new power generation. No new transmission lines or upgrades to LDC infrastructure. Simply more wasted money, lots of it, as a result of the Green Energy Act.

Questions put to the IESO about the May Variance amount got the following response from them:

“Hi Parker– the increase in GA deferral in May is mainly due to most LDCs submitting settlement data to the IESO based on the second GA estimate which was unusually high (i.e., 13.2 cent/KWh) in May. LDCs submit May settlement data to IESO during the first four business days of June at which time the actual GA rate would not have been calculated yet as per IESO’s settlement schedule. Each month there is a true up when LDCs submit their data to the IESO for the previous month plus an estimate of the current month they are submitting for.”

Read that and you have to ask, Why? Why not settle the Variance account once IESO has determined “the actual GA rate” rather than go through a series of wasted financial maneuvers? Logic doesn’t seem to be a formula used or followed within the electricity sector.

Are the ratepayers and taxpayers being “gamed” or can we trust IESO with our hard-earned money and believe that each and every action by them is truly being “audited” by the OEB?

I will leave the foregoing question to be answered by an “Electricity Audit” that will hopefully be conducted by Ontario’s new government.

PARKER GALLANT

 

Smart meters, smart grids, conservation campaigns: how well does IESO watch your money?

More on Ontario’s IESO…

August 1, 2018

Yesterday, I examined IESO’s responsibility in respect to the “financial settlement” associated with the various public and private electricity generation sources in the province, and their ability to execute those, considering all the variables connected with the GA (Global Adjustment) and the HOEP (hourly Ontario energy price).

I contemplated not only their ability to handle that responsibility, but also to deal effectively with the FHP (Fair Hydro Plan) and the HST rebate the prior Ontario government created.

Soon, the IESO will be further burdened with the financial aspects of the additional 12% reduction in residential electricity bills that the newly elected Premier Ford government has promised. IESO denies responsibility for any audit-associated issues and simply pays money to the LDC (local distribution companies), based on the data associated with the billing submitted.

The question today is this: is it possible possibility the IESO can be “gamed” as they already were by one of the gas generators for $100 million, as reported in December 2017?

IESO deals directly with all grid connected (TX) generators, plus approximately 70 LDCs in Ontario.  Those 70 LDCs in turn deal with well over 26,000 generators under the various MicroFIT programs, carrying a variety of contracted payment amounts. So, “gaming” IESO under their unaudited procedures should not be seen to be difficult.

Additionally, those LDCs are responsible for implementing campaigns associated with the numerous conservation programs, which annually dole out more than $400 million.  For example, Hydro One uses their five-year allotment of $338 million to basically do whatever they wish with the money, as long as they report back to IESO that they have reduced consumption via conservation programs. Toronto Hydro’s allocation is even higher than Hydro One’s at $396 million.   Strong “gaming” possibilities.

Now if you bother to look at past predictions of both data development and spending on that development, you would find aspirations speaking to “smart meters” and a “smart grid” as a means to take data and configure it in such a way to allow all of us to experience utopia! Presumably that “utopia” would make life easy for IESO to handle the financial aspects of managing day to day activities associated with generating power and bringing it to our households or businesses along with the many variables included in the Global Adjustment!

The facts, since the advent of both smart meters and smart grids however, dispel those notions of a forward-looking “cars will fly” utopia. As the Auditor General reported, the “smart meters” cost Ontario $2 billion which, as it turned out was twice as much as planned. The “smart grid” was advocated by a 10-member Smart Grid Forum in February 2009 with objectives loosely defined as “It is necessary change; change from a one-way ‘dumb’ grid to an interactive, intelligent smart grid.”   The Forum reached a consensus in respect to the costs of this “smart grid”: “The preliminary cost estimate by the Forum is that incremental capital spending over the initial five years would be $1.6 billion.”

Well, those five years have come and gone. To the best of my knowledge, there is no report indicating how far we are along in developing the “smart grid” or how much of the $1.6 billion has been spent, but what we do see on each and every electricity bill we get is a charge for its development.

So, “smart” meters, “smart” grids and all that data and the fact the IESO was “gamed.” It is still looking like a one-way “dump” on ratepayers.

Tomorrow, in Part 3 in this series, I look at what the Fair Hydro Plan has accomplished in the first year of its existence.

PARKER GALLANT

Numbers don’t lie: intermittent wind and solar surplus to Ontario’s energy needs

The IESO (Independent Electricity System Operator) released 2017 data for grid-connected* generation and consumption and, surprise! The data reveal that power from wind and solar is surplus to Ontario’s  energy needs.

IESO reported Ontario’s consumption/demand fell 4.9 TWh (terawatt hours) in 2017 to 132.1 TWh. That’s a drop equivalent to 3.6% from the prior year.

Nuclear (90.6 TWh) and hydro (37.7 TWh) power generation was 128.3 TWh, making up 97.1% of Ontario’s total demand (without including dispatched power from either nuclear or hydro). The cost to Ontario ratepayers for the 128.3 TWh was approximately $7.6 billion or 5.9 cents/kWh.

Spilled hydro (paid for by Ontario’s ratepayers but not used) reported by Ontario Power Generation or OPG was 4.5 TWh for the first nine months of 2017. Out that together with 511 nuclear manoeuvres and the number is 959.2 GWh (gigawatt hours) wasted but paid for by Ontario’s ratepayers. Add in three nuclear shutdowns and it means Ontario’s nuclear and hydro generation alone could have easily supplied more than 136 TWh of power or over 103% of demand.

That doesn’t include spilled hydro in the last quarter of 2017 which will probably exceed at least one TWh.

Nuclear and hydro does it all

Nuclear and hydro could also have supplied a large portion of net exports (exports less imports) had all the generation potential actually been delivered to the grid. Net exports totaled 12.5 TWh in 2017.  Grid connected wind (9.2 TWh) and solar (0.5 TWh) in 2017 supplied 9.7 TWh and their back-up generation: from gas plants, supplied 5.9 TWh.  In all, the latter three sources delivered 15.6 TWh or 124.8% of net exports.  Net exports were sold well below the average cost of generation. Exports brought in revenue of about $400 million, but here’s the kicker: that surplus power cost Ontario’s ratepayers $1.4 billion, which is really a loss of $1 billion.

Grid-connected wind, solar and gas generation collectively cost approximately $3.5 billion for the 15.6 TWh they delivered to the grid, included curtailed (paid for but not used) wind power generation of 3.3 TWh. The cost of the wind power was more than $220 million per TWh, or 22 cents/kWh. That’s almost double the Class B average rate of 11.55 cents/kWh cited in IESO’s 2017 year-end results.

The 9.7 TWh generated by wind and solar was unneeded. If it had been required, it could have been replaced by gas power generation at a cost of only around two cents per kWh. Why? Gas generators are guaranteed payment of  about $10K per MW (average) of their capacity per month to be at the ready and if called on to generate power are paid fuel costs plus a small markup.

Price tag: $2 billion

In other words, if no grid-connected wind or solar generation existed in Ontario in 2017 the bill to ratepayers would have been about $2 billion** less! Grid-connected wind generation (including curtailed) cost ratepayers in excess of $1.7 billion and grid-connected solar added another $250 million!

That $2 billion, coincidentally, is about the same cost estimate of the annual amount to be deferred, and paid by future rate increases via the Fair Hydro Plan! In other words the current government could have easily saved future generations the estimated $40 billion plus cost of the Fair Hydro Plan by having never contracted for wind and solar generation!

The IESO results for 2017 sure makes me wonder: why hasn’t the Ontario Ministry of Energy canceled all the wind power projects that have not yet broken ground?

 

*   Distributor connected solar (2,200 MW) and wind (600 MW) added over $1.4 billion to the GA.

** The first 6 months of the variance account under the Fair Hydro Plan in 2017 was $1,378.4 million.

 

Wind waste should worry Ontario ratepayers

Ontario’s electricity ratepayers paid more than $500 million in 2017 for nothing

With only one month left in the current year, the bad news on the electricity sector keeps getting worse.

Well before the official sources such as IESO report on how much power industrial wind turbines generated and how much was curtailed (constrained, or paid for but not added to the power grid), my friend Scott Luft has published his estimates for both the former and the latter for the month of November.

As he reports (conservatively), curtailed wind in November was over 422,000 megawatt hours (MWh)  that could have supplied 562,000 average Ontario households with free power for the month.

Instead, no one got free power; the cost of the 422,000 MWh of undelivered wind power to Ontario ratepayers was $120/MWh.  That $50.7-million cost for the month was simply added to the costs of the electricity bills ratepayers will be obliged to pay, while some of it will deferred to the future as part of the Fair Hydro Plan.

Somebody’s enjoying cheap power — not you  

No doubt the wasted wind power presented itself when it wasn’t needed; if it had been accepted into the grid, that extra power could have caused blackouts or brownouts, so it was curtailed.  At the same time, much of the grid-accepted wind was exported to our neighbours in New York, Michigan and elsewhere, at discount prices!  Curtailed wind for November 2017 compared to 2016 was almost 55% higher.

How bad is it? Let’s review the first 11 months of the current year, compared to 2016.

So far in 2017, curtailed wind is about 786,000 MWh higher (+33.8%) at just over 3.1million MWh.  The cost of all the curtailed wind so far in 2017 is approximately $373.6 million, or $94.3 million more than 2016 costs.

And wind wasn’t the only source of power generation constrained. When Ontario Power Group reported their third Quarter (September 30, 2017) results they said this:

“Baseload generation supply surplus in Ontario continued to be prevalent in 2017, resulting in forgone hydroelectric generation for OPG of 1.1 TWh*: and 4.5 TWh in the three and nine month periods ended September 30, 2017, respectively, compared to 0.5 TWh and 3.9 TWh during the corresponding periods in 2016.”  

Translation: ratepayers will pick up the approximately $165 million cost of that waste via their electricity bills.

Not only are we curtailing wind and spilling hydro, but we also steamed off nuclear power generated by Bruce Nuclear at the same time we pay for idling gas plants to back up intermittent wind and solar power generation.

Intermittent wind and solar cost us

The cost of “greening” Ontario with unreliable and intermittent wind and solar keeps climbing, no matter what their proponents or politicians say.  As ratepayers and taxpayers we should reflect on why 25% of the waste of the noted 7.6 TWh of undelivered power and its cost of $539 million (so far this year) is being deferred via the Fair Hydro Plan.  And at the same time, we should recognize that we have experienced the worst possible planning in the Energy Ministry in the history of the province.

The energy sector in Ontario needs real planning by experts that will provide real value for money and save ratepayers from paying more than $500 million a year … for nothing!

~

*  1 (one) terawatt is equivalent to 1 billion kWh