The waste of power in Ontario is a scandal

The Wynne government is selling off surplus power at bargain rates … and yet, has contracted for more power produced out-of-phase with demand. Time to reverse engines.

LRP I contracts awarded this year, the LRP II, and contracts for any unbuilt wind power projects should get the axe
LRP I contracts awarded this year, the LRP II, and contracts for any unbuilt wind power projects should get the axe

November 14, 2016

Ontario’s Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) has responsibility for running the “market” referred to as the HOEP (Hourly Ontario Electricity Price). That is defined as “the average of the twelve market clearing prices in each hour.” IESO also says the HOEP is  “a real-time market, meaning purchases of electricity are made as they are needed. There are occasions, when the best-priced energy may not be available due to limitations on the transmission lines. In this case, that generator’s offer is still used to help set the price, but another generator may be asked to provide the electricity.”

Since the beginning of 2016, the “real-time market” has valued a traded megawatt (MWh) at an average of about $16.00 or 1.6 cents a kilowatt (kWh). Compare that to what households and small businesses pay, an average price of 11.1 cents a kWh or almost seven times the market rate.

What the HOEP market is telling Ontario’s Minister of Energy Glenn Thibeault: the value you get ratepayers to pay for unreliable and intermittent renewable energy in the form of wind and solar generation has absolutely no relationship to its actual worth!

The data my friend Scott Luft posts highlights just how much the feed-in-tariff (FIT) program, with their above market rate contracts for intermittent wind and solar have distorted the HOEP.

Scott’s data source is the IESO although for reasons best known to them they don’t post DX (local distributed FIT and MicroFIT contracted generation) connected wind or solar generation. Scott estimates these in his spreadsheet and his estimates have so far proven to be conservative when the DX results are posted many months later.

Let’s examine the data. The TX (transmission connected) wind generation for the first 10 months of the current year (January 1st to October 31st) was (rounded) 6,966,000 MWh, and the DX connected are estimated at 1,079,000 MWh.  Curtailed wind generation is estimated at 1,804,000 MWh bringing total wind (generated and curtailed) to 9,849,000 MWh.. Those 9.8 TWh (terawatt hours) could have supplied approximately 1.3 million “average” households with electricity if it was delivered when needed.

It wasn’t.

So what that means is, 26% of the available energy from TX connected wind power developments was curtailed. Combining TX and DX curtailed wind MWh represents 18.3% of available energy from that source!

Power sold at a fraction of the contract price

At the same time as wind turbines were delivering or curtailing those megawatts of power, IESO was exporting surplus generation to our neighbours in New York, Michigan, Quebec, etc., selling it for a fraction of the FIT contracted price. Referring again to Scott Luft’s data it should be noted he actually includes the average HOEP price as of the hour(s) of generation or curtailment.   That price averaged about $9.50 per MWh for the 10 months using his data!   The sale price is a far cry from the FIT and MicroFIT contracted value for wind of $135.00/MWh plus as much as 20% for cost of living (COL) increases and an estimated $120.00/MWh for curtailed generation.

What we can calculate from the pricing information is that wind power generated and curtailed for the 10 months cost ratepayers almost $1.3 billion. If all the 9.8 TWh were included in the exported surpluses the net cost to ratepayers after recovering almost $100 million (9.8 TWh X $9.5 per TWh = $93.1 million) from its sale value is $1.2 billion. That’s about the same as moving two gas plants.

Cost: $300 a year for each electricity customer

The monthly cost of $120 million adds over $300 annually to the average ratepayer’s bill — and that doesn’t include the additional costs of the wasted power from other sources such as spilled hydro, steamed-off nuclear or the idling gas plants.

While we can’t say for sure the exported surplus generation sold to our neighbours came from industrial wind power developments, it is worth noting exports to the end of October were about 18.2 TWh or almost twice the amount of generated and curtailed wind produced in the same time-frame. Was wind-generated electricity a large part of those exports or did it cause other, cheaper, power to be exported? It is extremely likely.

Energy Minister Thibeault needs to recognize he needs to permanently cancel LRP I and LRP II along with any remaining unbuilt wind and solar projects in order to stop the upward pressure on electricity rates.   As noted in the press release from the Ministry September 27, 2016, “Ontario will benefit from a robust supply of electricity over the coming decade to meet projected demand.”

It’s time for Energy Minister Thibeault to recognize the power to reduce upward pressure on electricity rates resides with him; he should use it to halt purchases of power we don’t need.

 

How to get electricity bills down: letter to Ontario’s Energy Minister (2)

Parker Gallant

August 16, 2016

OPEN LETTER TO:

The Honourable Glen Thibeault, Minister of Energy,

Legislative Building, Queen’s Park, Toronto ON, M7A 1A1

Dear Minister Thibeault:

Re: Taxing the wind

While I have not as yet received a response to my letter to you of July 17, 2016 I recognize that you are probably still trying to digest the complexities of your portfolio before responding so I will be patient.

I have just read an interesting article1. about the State of Wyoming and specifically the state legislature who asked the question: “who owns the wind?” and I just had to send you my suggestion based on what they have done to increase their tax base.

Well as it turns out the state legislature answered the question quickly and claim ownership of the wind in their state. Wyoming’s lawmakers quickly enacted legislation levying a tax on a per megawatt hour (MWh) basis at $1 per MWh but are looking at increasing it to $12.00/MWh.

It seems to me this is an opportunity for you to do two things! The first is to increase tax revenue and the second would be to use the increased tax revenue to defray future rate increases.

Recognizing that Ontario is far more generous with the long term wind and solar contracts than the U.S. state governments’ my recommendations would be to simply levy the tax as a percentage of the contract price and/or the curtailment price. I would suggest a 10% tax for delivered MWh and a 15% tax for curtailed generation. The latter is based on the fact that wind generated electricity is often only available when its not needed so the higher suggested tax rate.

Just looking at the first six months of the current year I see it shaping up as follows:

  1. Delivered MWh were 4,581,770 according to IESO and at say $13.50/MWh would generate tax of $61.2 million.
  2. Curtailed MWh from wind developments in the 1st 6 months of the current year were 1,234,000 and at 15% of $120.00/MWh (estimated) would generate $22.4 million.Together the two could generate tax revenue of approximately $165 million annually and if applied to the average ratepayer bill would reduce it by about $37.00 annually.

Now if you applied a tax to solar generation (perhaps the 15% rate) you would generate additional tax revenue of $210 million2. and that could reduce residential ratepayers bills by an additional $47.00 annually.

The latter would entail the Ontario legislation claiming they own the sunlight reaching the province allowing that generation but it doesn’t seem like a major obstacle.

The Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, Glen Murray has basically claimed the ability to tax carbon emissions (even though they may be emitted by transport trucks, etc. licensed elsewhere using Ontario’s highways) so if he can do it so can you!

Alternatively you could simply do what the State of Nevada did as noted in the same article referenced above which claims: “the Nevada Public Utilities Commission (PUC) voted unanimously to increase a monthly fee on solar customers by 40% while reducing the amount they get paid for excess power sold to the grid.

Good luck and I look forward to your response to my original letter in due course. I do hope you will take my letter seriously as I know you have been inundated with numerous complaints about the rising costs of electricity in the province since you have assumed the “energy” portfolio.

Yours truly,

Parker Gallant

  1. Link to the article is here: http://www.activistpost.com/2016/08/state-now-claims-owns-wind-taxing-renewable-energy-existence.html]
  2. This assumes an average rate of $448.00/MWh or 44.8 cents a kilowatt hour for all solar contracts.

Ontario Power Generation report: waste and loss, more cost to consumers

Spilling, constraining, steaming off–Ontario’s surplus power situation is costing millions

August 14, 2016

Ontario Power Generation (OPG) just released their second quarter results and if you read the news release quickly you might think everything is wonderful — but it’s not.

OMA (operations, maintenance and administration) costs were up $59 million (9.1%) for the quarter compared to 2015, net income was down to $132 million from $189 million in the comparable quarter, and OPG are now the proud owners of Hydro One shares as this excerpt from the quarterly report indicates.

“In April 2016, OPG acquired nine million common shares of Hydro One at $23.65 per share as part of a secondary share offering by the Province through a syndicate of underwriters. The acquisition was made for investment purposes to mitigate the risk of future price volatility related to OPG’s future share delivery obligations to eligible employees under the collective agreements with the PWU and The Society renewed in 2015.”

The Hydro One share acquisition was of course one of the “net-zero” wage settlements touted by the Ontario Liberal government, and this one made specifically by former Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli when the announcement of a settlement with the employees at OPG was made.

Paid to waste power–and you pay them to do it

OPG also disclosed in the news release that they were again forced to spill hydro power which is normally sold into the grid for about 4.4 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh). The amount they spilled in the quarter was 1.7 terawatts (TWh) and 3.4 TWh for the first six months, compared to 1.5 TWh in the comparable 2015 six month period.  If that information makes you feel bad for OPG, don’t — they are paid the same for spilling hydro as for delivering it to the grid.  A change in regulations by the government created the “pay for spilling” situation.  The 3.4 TWh spilled could have supplied about 750,000 “average” households meaning, we wouldn’t have needed other much more expensive power such as intermittent and unreliable wind and solar.

The cost to ratepayers for the spillage of the hydro is about $150 million and will wind up in our electricity bills under the Global Adjustment charge.

While OPG were busy spilling hydro, we were also curtailing wind in the first six months of this year; my friend Scott Luft (http://coldair.luftonline.net/) keeps a record of those curtailments. Curtailments for the first six months on his chart were estimated at 1.245 TWh, and have already surpassed IESO reported curtailments for the whole of 2015 of .733 TWh.   The latter cost ratepayers about $88 million at the reputed $120 per megawatt (MWh) wind generators are paid for curtailment.   Curtailment costs for 2016 so far are about $150 million.

There were other wastes of generation and ratepayers money in the first six months of 2016 too as Bruce Power was frequently asked to “steam off” nuclear generation at two of their units, but no disclosure is yet available to tell us how much. In 2015 it amounted to .897 TWh which cost ratepayers about $60 million; it is probably more in 2016 as demand is down.

So ratepayers for just the first six months of 2016 will pick up the costs for OPG buying Hydro One shares, spilling hydro, curtailing wind, and steaming off nuclear without one kWh delivered to the “average” household despite the ratepayers responsibility for costs of about $600 million.   We also picked up costs to promote conservation which was probably north of $200 million for the six months.

Ontario’s electricity customers should be “steamed” about the increasing waste we continue to pay for.

© Parker Gallant