How best to shut down the Canadian Economy? It’s Complicated!

Dan McTeague, former Liberal MP and well known as the “Gas Price Wizard” is also President of Canadians for Affordable Energy. Dan invited me to submit a post which is now up on that website.

It covers a fair amount of ground referencing a couple of Globe & Mail articles and the reaction to them by Gerald Butts and Bruce Lourie.  I think you will find it interesting and not too “complicated”!   Find it here:

http://www.affordableenergy.ca/lourie_and_butts_wrestle?utm_campaign=how_best_to_shut_down&utm_medium=email&utm_source=affordableenergy

Parker Gallant Unmasks The Architects Of The Green Energy Scam

I was once again invited to be on the Marc Patrone show on radio station Newstalk Sauga 960 AM to discuss the recent event announcing the creation of the “Task Force for a Resilient Recovery”.  While the principal chat was about the foregoing Marc and I covered other related issues dealing with the energy sector.  It is a 12 minute segment posted here:

Parker Gallant Unmasks The Architects Of The Green Energy Scam

 

Ontario’s Lock-down is Bad News for Small/Medium Sized Businesses

IESO has just released their March Monthly Market Summary and it hammered Ontario’s small and medium sized businesses where 42% (2..4 million) of Ontario’s private sector employees work, according to the CFIB (Canadian Federation of Independent Business).

The lock-down imposed by the Ontario and Federal governments, related to the pandemic, has driven down electricity consumption in the province with March being an early warning to the extended shutdown.  The March 2020 Monthly Market Summary when compared to the March 2019 summary indicates an overall drop in consumption of 5.7% or 669.3 GWh* (gigawatt hours) and 86.6% (580 GWh) of the drop was by Class B ratepayers.

While consumption dropped, Ontario’s net exports increased from 2019 by 664.1 GWh but as we ratepayers know that is not a good thing as those exports are sold at the market price or HOEP which fell 49% from an average of $27.34/MWh in 2019 to $13.93/MWh in 2020.  What that means is even though net exports increased by 80% revenues decreased from $22.7 million to $20.8 million. That implies; because of the way energy costs are allocated in Ontario, generating excess power (principally wind and solar) and selling it to our neighbours is akin to simply giving it away.

Now looking at the cost of consumption in the province and the transfer of support from Class B to Class A ratepayers the results are worse.  In March 2019 Class B ratepayers consumed 8.629 GWh and the GA (Global Adjustment) costs were $692.2 million meaning the average GA per MWh was $80.41/MWh and the HOEP added $27.34 making the overall cost of a MWh/$107.75 (10.7 cents/kWh). In 2020 it grew to a GA of $119.42/MWh and with the HOEP of $13.93/MWh added, it came to $133.35/MWh (13.3 cents/kWh) or an increase of $26.60/MWh.  Class A ratepayers on the other hand had an all-in rate in 2019 of $75.76/MWh and $75.87/MWh in 2020, an increase of only 9 cents/MWh.

Included in the Class B customer base are all residential customers (and farmers) but the Ford Government froze those rates at 10.1 cents/kWh due to the Covid-19 pandemic.  The government did nothing for all of the remaining small and medium sized Class B businesses who are shouldering more than just high electricity rates due to the lock-down.  Their livelihood is at stake!

How can the government expect Class B small and medium sized businesses to continue to support the larger Class A customers via the cost shift and hope they will survive the pandemic?

The time has come for the province to recognize how important to Ontario those businesses and their 2.4 million employees really are! Either they should fix the mess those contracted wind and solar generators have created, amend the methodology of the Global Adjustment, or, offer relief to the rest of the Class B ratepayers.

April looks to be even worse for those businesses so the Government should fix it now!

 

*A GWh is 1,000 MWh and the 669.3 GWh is what 890,000 average Ontario households consume monthly.

Climate Change Activists and their Strange Bedfellows

For a couple of decades, individuals and environmental groups around the world voiced the view that AGW (anthropogenic global warming), now referenced as “climate change”, was an upcoming catastrophic event, unless we humans curb emissions of CO2. An increase of earth’s average temperature of 1.5 degrees by the year 2100 forecast by the UNIPCC, would reputedly destroy mankind.  Politicians around the world bought into the premise; it was mankind causing the climate to change!

Those politicians, inspired by eco-warriors insisted; we must stop using fossil fuels or we are doomed.

Those who weren’t completely sold on the “premise” (this writer included) as time went on, lost faith in the forecasts and the uptake of the pseudo-science the UNIPCC and others proclaimed. More and more evidence of their bad forecasts were slowly laid bare. The claims made; looked to be nothing more than a giant “Ponzi scheme” or simply ignorance among those screaming the loudest.

Politicians around the world however, bought into the claims! Those politicians agreed technology like; wind turbines, biomass, ethanol, solar cells, electric cars, etc. were a way to end fossil fuel usage and save mankind from the catastrophe.  Politicians rushed to buy into the foregoing even though the technology associated with most of it was developed in the late 1800’s or early 1900’s.  Legislation, regulations, mandates, etc. were passed with increasing frequency to achieve the goals set by the eco-warriors! Electricity rates and other fuel costs shot up in countries where government subsidies were mandated and taxpayers paid for them. Those actions have cost trillions of dollars globally!

Needless to say the push to discard fossil fuels in Canada reached an epiphany in the minds of the eco-warriors as Canadians elected a minority Liberal government last fall.  Support would come from the NDP, the Green Party and the Bloc!  The election results would surely deliver their objectives!

Suddenly however, Canada and the rest of the world were caught up in the Covid-19 pandemic and “climate change” was relegated to an issue well down the list of priorities. The pandemic however, didn’t discourage those eco-warriors as they joined hands and sent dozens of letters to parliament claiming “climate change” needed to be treated as the next major catastrophic event.

Even as government deficits climbed those eco-warriors and their corporate compatriots such as CanWEA joined together. Robert Hornung of CanWEA even had the gall to suggest on March 24, 2020 to “Bloomberg Law”* that: “Among possible renewable energy measures, the federal government could speed up the Canada Infrastructure Bank’s construction of green projects, Robert Hornung, President of the Canadian Wind Energy Association, said.” The group also suggested the government increase the amount of renewable energy it consumes.” The same article quotes Chris Severson-Baker, Alberta’s regional director at the Pembina Institute in respect to Alberta Premier Kenny’s ask of “the federal government to suspend any new environmental regulations, including any increase in a national carbon tax.”  Kenny’s request upset Severson-Baker who said; “It’s total opportunism to talk about targeting those things”.  Apparently, he believes it’s OK to tax us all while creating further unemployment in the middle of this economic meltdown while our governments spend our future taxes by the tens of billions of dollars and many companies lose their ability to survive. 

Very recently eco-warriors have become totally silent, perhaps due to the recent release of Michael Moore’s documentary; Planet of the Humans on Earth Day (April 22nd).  Since its “free” release, just four days ago on YouTube it has had almost 2.4 million views.

The documentary delves into the relationship between eco-warriors and certain capitalists such as Michael Bloomberg, Richard Branson, Al Gore, Jeremy Grantham, GM, Goldman Sachs, Koch Brothers, and several others.  Along the way it discloses how both groups benefited by feeding false information to the media and to those of us absorbing the messages repeated by the MSM.

The film dispels the reputed benefits of industrial wind turbines, solar panels, ethanol fuels, biomass, EVs and their batteries and highlights either the incompetence and or lies spread by eco-warriors in their push to save the world. The film brings out the fact those sources of energy actually do more harm than good for the environment and have little if any effect on emissions.

The fact the film connects eco-warriors to the corporate elite suggests the collaboration is really about extracting monies from the general population more than it was about saving the planet. To this writer it certainly appears to have been one of the biggest “Ponzi schemes” ever perpetrated but will we ever know the truth?

*It is worth noting Bloomberg Law is a part of the Bloomberg Industry Group founded by Michael Bloomberg the former Democratic Presidential candidate and multi-billionaire, mentioned in Michael Moore’s documentary “Planet of the Humans”.

Another Day and over $15 million was Tossed Away

Once again Ontario ratepayers and taxpayers were forced to throw $15 million plus into the garbage.

Yesterday, April 21, 2020, our electricity system operator, IESO, managed the grid in a way that treats ratepayers and taxpayers as bottomless pits. The wind was blowing strong throughout the province and if all their generation was accepted into the grid it would have generated more power than hydro did.

IESO accepted 48,100 MWh of wind generation and curtailed 47,200 MWh.  At the same time, they gave away 70,000 MWh to our neighbours! Yes “gave away” is correct as yesterday’s market price or HOEP was -0.05 ($/MWh) according to IESO’s Daily Market Summary.

The 48,100 MWh of wind cost us $6.5 million and curtailed wind another $5.7 million so the total cost of wind generation for the day was $12.2 million or $254/MWh (25.4 cents/kWh) for the grid accepted portion.  Almost all of the 70,000 MWh was given away to New York and Michigan so effectively we are helping them financially cope with the costs of the Covid-19 pandemic by providing them with FREE energy. The 70,000 MWh we gave away was about what 2.8 million average Ontario households (over 50% of all households in the province) would consume in one day.

If we calculate the MWh we gave away in excess of the grid accepted wind (70,000 MWh – 48,100 MWh = 21,900 MWh) at IESO’s first estimate of the Global Adjustment* (GA) of $137.07 we can add another $2.9 million to the monies we were forced to toss away yesterday. That makes the total hit to Ontario’s residential and small and medium sized businesses over $15.2 million above what electricity should have cost us for the day.

If we did this every day of the year the cost to Ontario’s taxpayers and ratepayers would be over $5 billion annually.

Time for Ontario’s current government to put an end to this and pass legislation to stop this craziness!

*April’s GA is likely to be north of $160/MWh according to my friend Scott Luft.

Ratepayers get Dinged Again for Nothing

Ratepayers get Dinged Again for Nothing

If the $43.4 million Ontario ratepayers and taxpayers paid for nothing Easter weekend wasn’t bad enough news, unfortunately, the bad news keeps on coming!

Monday April 13th added another big chunk of money to the coffers of generators (mainly those who own the industrial wind turbines [IWT]).  The wind was blowing when it wasn’t needed but IESO took 58,700 MWh of it, added it to the grid and also paid for another 20,800 MWh of curtailed wind with our dollars.  Together IWT, (grid accepted and curtailed) added $10.5 million to the costs of generating power for the day.

Total “Ontario Demand” was 313,295 MWh but IESO accepted 406,320 MWh (IESO refer to that as “Market Demand”) even though the additional 93,025 MWh wasn’t needed.  IESO sold off the excess generation via the HOEP (hourly Ontario electricity price) market and the maximum price they got for it was 0.00 cents/MWh.

The above easily demonstrates wind generation wasn’t needed. Grid accepted wind represented 62.4% of what was sold for -0.03 cents/MWh according to IESO’s Daily Market Summary, but it cost us $10.5 million.  As if to add to the grief, the additional 36,414 MWh we sold for nothing cost another $5 million, using IESO’s first GA estimate of $137.07/MWh for the month.  It’s also worth mentioning idling gas plants added approximately $3.2 million to the day’s costs to back-up wind and solar generation.

The total dollar amount of $18.7 million for another day of waste added $60/MWh to the costs of Ontario’s Demand of 313,295 MWh pushing costs close to $200/MWh or .20cents/kWh. We also probably got dinged for spilled hydro which would add further costs but IESO don’t disclose that information.

It’s time our current government recognized the catastrophe the McGuinty/Wynne governments created in respect to the electricity sector. I’m confident the ratepayers and taxpayers of Ontario would be delighted if the Ford government used their power to end this insane result of the Ontario Liberal’s Green Energy Act.

Fix it please as we taxpayers and ratepayers are tired of paying for NOTHING!

Easter Weekend and Wind Generators Gorged on Ontario’s Chocolates

Since the McGuinty led, Ontario Liberal government, passed the Green Energy Act in 2009 handing out lucrative above market contracts, Ontario ratepayers have been saddled with increasing costs. Industrial wind generators tend to produce more energy in the middle of the night and during the Spring and Fall when demand is at its lowest levels.  Easter weekend was atypical!

Average demand during a mid-January or mid-July weekend typically has a daily average of just under 400,000 MWh but in the Spring and Fall Ontario’s weekend demand is normally 100,000 MWh less and the past Easter weekend was no exception.  According to IESO’s Daily Market Summaries for April 10th, 11th and 12th the average daily Ontario demand was 293,400 MWh. If one does the math the hourly average demand over the three days was 12,225 MWh, easily supplied by nuclear which averaged over 10,000 MW over the 72 hours and hydro at an average of less than 4,000 MW.  In one hour when wind generation dropped and demand increased hydro ramped up to over 4,800 MW so together nuclear and hydro could have easily supplied all of our needs even when Ontario demand peaked at 14,174 MW.

Unfortunately, those “must take” contracts granted to wind and solar generators meant IESO were obliged to either accept their generation or pay to curtail what they might generate.  Over those three days, lESO accepted approximately 125,000 MWh of wind generation to the grid and curtailed 84,400 MWh.  The cost of the grid accepted and curtailed wind power works out to a cost of $213.44/MWh or about $26.9 million for unneeded power.

Saying the electricity wind generated was unneeded is not a misnomer, as over those three days we exported 250,000 MWh which was double grid accepted wind.  To make the obvious more obvious IESO sold exports at an average price of $2.71/MWh so if we assume all of the wind generated electricity was exported it would have generated $339 thousand while costing $26.9 million.  Even paying the idling costs (about $10K per month per MW) on the 9,500 MW capacity of gas plants (to back up wind and solar generation) only cost us about $9 million for the three days. The other exported power of 125,000 MWh over those three days cost us the GA (Global Adjustment).  Based on IESO’s first estimate for April the forecast of the GA at $137.07/MWh would mean the additional 125,000 MWh exported; cost ratepayers/taxpayers another $17.1 million.  I am confident we were spilling hydro and paying for it too but IESO don’t disclose that information (transparency is frequently not in their vocabulary).

Summing up  

Adding the costs of wind generation of $26.9 million to the costs of the other exported generation of $17.1 million and deducting the revenue from the sale of the exports of  $600K would see Ontario ratepayers/taxpayers paying $43.4 million over the three days for NOTHING!  Something is inherently wrong with the management of our electricity system despite all of those well-paid public servants operating it.  Thank god it was a cloudy weekend or solar costs would have added to the burden.

Spurious Claims 

While researching the above I was made aware of a letter sent to our esteemed (sarcasm intended) Prime Minister signed by over 250 people  principally associated with universities.  The letter was posted on the website of the National Observer and focused on telling the PM to not execute a “bail-out” for the oil and gas sector.  The following paragraph with its obvious connection to what Ontario has experienced as a result of the Provincial Liberals passing the GEA, displays either their inability to see the obvious or, their complete lack of common sense!  To wit:

 “It inot acceptable to give privileged access to big business associations while excluding representatives from trade unions, universities, municipalities, Indigenous communities and non-profit organizations that work on behalf of the public interest.

Public investment in oil and gas at this time is a highly speculative proposition, and particularly unwise given the urgent need for strategic investments in economic recovery.”

Taxpayers annually hand out hundreds of billions to all of those groups they suggest are “excluded” and the money they receive is generated by the private sector including those in the oil and gas businesses and their supply stream.

Had those professors and reputed experts bothered to examine big business associations such as CanWEA or CanSIA to determine how much they extract from Canadian ratepayers/taxpayers in after-tax dollars they might have been shocked. The Easter weekend in Ontario demonstrates what “privileged access” really looks like!

Looking ahead

Perhaps the time has arrived for Premier Ford to use the Province’s declaration of the “State of Emergency” to reduce payments to wind and solar generators as part of the pandemic exercise.  Unlike so many other companies in Ontario the operators of wind and solar generation have not stepped forward to assist in the fight against Covid-19 and the economic cost to the country. They just want our money.

Time to take away wind and solar generators “privileged access”!

Social Distancing for Covid-19 affects electricity costs

The economic effects of Covid-19 are driving up the costs of electricity for residential and small businesses in jurisdictions, like Ontario, where time-of-use pricing is the standard.  As many businesses shut down temporally, lay off their employees or get them to work from home, electricity consumption will drop.  That drop will have little effect on the generators of that power, be they crown corporations or privately contracted ones. They receive guaranteed prices for their generation and for curtailed power (wind and solar), spilled hydro or steamed-off nuclear.  To add fuel to the fire we export surplus power to our neighbours at a price of about 10% of its cost.

The “social distancing” resulting from business closures, etc. will result in a power consumption drop. Despite the drop, however, costs to ratepayers and taxpayers will climb.  The effect; resulting from that social distancing and those milder temperatures during the Spring Freshet, means, demand will fall and consumption will drop even more than it always does during April, May and June.

Ironically those three months is when the wind is blowing and the sun is shining meaning industrial wind and solar generation is high and those contracted generators have “must-take” contracts and are also paid handsomely to curtail their generation.

As an example of the foregoing Scott Luft tracks wind generation and its curtailment and in 2019 during those three months ratepayers picked up the $111 million cost of 938,244 MWh (megawatt hours) of curtailed wind.  That curtailed generation represented what 447,000 average households would consume in three months.  To make matters worse Ontario exported 5,145,700 MWh (what 2.4 million average households would consume) to our neighbours and sold it for an average of $8/MWh but the costs of that generation was north of $120/MWh. A rough estimate of the cost of selling off that surplus is $575 million. So, ratepayers in Ontario, during last Spring, paid almost $700 million for nothing!  During those same three months 2,266,700 MWh of wind generation was accepted and paid for at a cost to the ratepayers/taxpayers of approximately $330 million and solar’s 1 TWh or so of generation, added costs of over $500 million. We clearly didn’t need any of that!

As if to exacerbate the foregoing (during this pandemic) our system of control, over pricing, via the Ontario Energy Board, allows our major generators, OPG and others, the ability to generate a ROE (return on equity) in the 9% range.

Ratepayers represented by small and medium sized businesses are fighting to stay alive during this pandemic and must pay the full time-of-use rates which during high demand hours are 20.8 cents/kWh to keep the revenue flowing to those in the electricity sector.

Time to use the “State of Emergency”

Perhaps it’s time for Premier Ford to use the recently declared “State of Emergency” for the electricity sector to ease the pain for our small and medium sized businesses as well as all of those residential customers who have been temporally laid off.   Pass legislation that will get our contracted and crown owned electricity generators to reduce their generation prices during this pandemic.

It’s time for all of us to equally share the pain!

Ontario’s industrial wind turbines many costs

Wind’s visible costs

An article posted February 10, 2020 highlighted how wind generation, on its own, represented a cost of $12.760 billion over the ten years from 2010 to 2019 to Ontario ratepayers. Industrial wind turbines (IWT) had delivered 83.3 TWh and curtailed 10.5 TWh over that time.  The combined cost of the generation and curtailment represented an average delivered cost per kWh of 15.32 cents without factoring in costs of gas plants being at the ready when the wind wasn’t blowing or spilling clean hydro.

Over the same ten years, exports of surplus power to our neighbours cost ratepayers about $12.5 billion dollars. Wind’s habit of generating power in the middle of the night and spring and fall when demand is low drives down the market price; HOEP (Hourly Ontario Energy Price), resulting in export sales at prices well below contracted rates. This results in ratepayers having to pay the difference.

Last weekend (February 22nd and 23rd) was no exception.  The wind was blowing for the two days but Ontario Demand was low averaging 341,800 MWh.  IWT however, were generating power we didn’t need with grid accepted wind at 148,175 MWh and 14,900 MWh curtailed.  The cost of both, was $24 million or 16.2 cents/kWh. IESO was busy exporting surplus power of 141,648 MWh or 96% of grid accepted wind. On top of that we were probably spilling water (and paying for it) at the same time.

The question the foregoing elicits is; how much were we paid for those exports?  Exports sold February 22nd were at the average price of $1.99/MWh and $1.64/MWh on the 23rd so total revenue earned was a miserly $239 thousand versus a cost to ratepayers and taxpayers of the province of over $24 million just for what the IWT delivered.  Our neighbours must love us!

Winds hidden costs

While the foregoing confirms IWT have the habit of being unreliable and intermittent and require backup from gas plants they also have other bad habits.  One example is their killing of birds. The Audubon Society has suggested it is anywhere from 140,000 to 328,000 annually. They also kill bats in large numbers. Bird Studies Canada in 2016 estimated the kill rate in Ontario was 18.5 kills per turbine (over 50,000 annually). Many killed are on the endangered list!  Additionally, tourism areas may also be negatively affected by IWT as noted in a poll in Scotland by the “John Muir Trust (JMT) found that 55% of respondents were “less likely” to venture into areas of the countryside industrialised by giant turbines”.

A recent report from Wind Concerns Ontario (WCO) raises many other negative issues related to IWT!  The report is a synopsis of complaints about IWT submitted by rural residents of Ontario living within close proximity of IWT.  Those complaints were submitted to the MOECC (now the MOECP. The report titled: “Response to Wind Turbine Noise Complaints” analyzed 674 complaints made during 2017.  The shocking issue revealed is: “Only nine of the 674 complaints, or 1.3% of total records, indicated that there was a field response.”  What that suggests is the MOECP’s field offices are either not equipped to deal with complaints or believe the IWT contracted parties will somehow resolve them.  In excess of 5,200 complaints have been logged by WCO since IWT first started to appear in the province and most of them were related to audible and inaudible (infrasound) noise levels. Other complaints have been associated with aquifer (water) contamination, shadow flicker, ice throws, etc.

Approximately 15% of the population will experience negative health effects from the proximity of IWT; a similar percentage to those who suffer from motion sickness.  The effects of audible and infrasound noise will produce; nausea, headaches, anxiety, ringing ears, feeling of exhaustion, etc.  Those individuals will naturally contact their doctors or other health care professionals for treatment adding to the cost of Ontario’s health care system. Those costs are not attributed to the cause, which are the IWT!

Other outcomes where IWT add (hidden) costs is in respect to property values as they are driven lower.  Many studies have confirmed values drop and an Ontario Superior Court ruling suggested the drop was from 22% to 55%.  The drop in values affects the realty tax base in municipalities hosting IWT and could result in lost services due to declining revenue or a substantial increase in realty taxes.

Let’s summarize the visible and invisible costs of IWT:

  1. Increased electricity costs due to the need for duplicate power sources such as gas plants.
  2. Increased surplus power which must be curtailed or sold for pennies on the dollar.
  3. Increased costs due to IWT inability to generate power when actually needed.
  4. Increased surplus power from IWT often means other clean sources must either spill (hydro) or steam off (nuclear) power which adds costs to our electricity bills.
  5. IWT kill birds and bats, many of whom are “species at risk” meaning insects, damaging to crops, are not eaten and farmers must spray their crops with insecticides adding costs to produce.
  6. IWT may affect tourism areas driving away tourists and thereby affect income to those regions.
  7. IWT cause various health problems requiring our health system to respond to individuals affected, thereby adding to health care costs.
  8. IWT cause property values to fall affecting the realty tax base where they operate and the value of the property should the occupants try to sell after the installation of those IWT has occurred.
  9. IWT lifespan is relatively short (20 years at most) compared to traditional sources of electricity generation and when unable to perform, create costs of remediation and disposal of recyclable and non-recyclable materials they consumed when built and erected.

While CanWEA will brag  about the fact that the “fuel” powering IWT is free they ignore all of the other costs.  Is it any wonder, even though electricity from a wind turbine was first created by Sir James Blyth in 1887, it failed to have an influence on the “electrification” of either the UK or anywhere else in the world. Until the UNIPCC forecast their purported concern about “global warming”, IWT were generally found only in very remote locations.  The technology is 133 years old but the “climate emergency” advocates think it’s still relevant!

My forecast is IWT will never, ever, fully replace fossil fuels due to their costs, unreliability, the harm they cause to humans and to birds, bats and turtles! This old technology should be disregarded in the effort to reduce greenhouse gases.

Pigs can fly and “Renewable energy should be the cornerstone of Canada’s net zero strategy”

A recent article in the Globe and Mail, as noted above, makes claims that cannot be supported by facts. The article tries to suggest Canada can be saved from the cataclysmic clutches of climate change but it is obvious the reporter (term used lightly) simply took what he was told and accepted it—no questions asked!

The article uses claims made by the spokespeople of the four parties who, in 2015, founded the Canadian Council on Renewable Energy (CanCORE).  Those four parties are the trade associations for the wind, solar, tides and hydro electricity generating companies.

Some of the information was taken from what appears to be a singular report on the CanCORE website from 2016 and embellished by the spokespeople, eg: “The flexible and dependable foundation provided by Canada’s existing waterpower infrastructure, coupled with the rapidly plunging costs of our wind and solar resources, makes renewable energy the least costly option for new clean and reliable power.”

The article says 60% of Canada’s electricity generation comes from hydro, 399.1 TWh  (terawatt hours) and 68% from all four.  So, the 8% difference came from wind, solar and tides.  If one reviews the latest information available from Natural Resources Canada in 2017, total electricity generation was 652 TWh .  Wind in 2017, is credited with the provision of 28.7 TWh, solar 3.3 TWh and tides with 0.2 TWh.

Further on in the article it says: “Waterpower is so abundant in Canada that increasing capacity at existing waterpower sites by less than 2 per cent would produce enough electricity to more than power Canada’s entire light-duty vehicle fleet.”  There is nothing in the article or the CanCORE report indicating what is meant by the “entire light-duty vehicle fleet” or it’s required power.  Putting that aside, a 2% increase in hydro generation would represent 8 TWh.

Looking at Ontario (only), OPG’s 2017 financial report noted hydro spillage was 5.9 TWh due to SBG (surplus baseload generation). The spillage was likely caused by wind generation added to the grid when it wasn’t needed as it is granted “first-to-the-grid” rights. To top things off, 2017 also saw 3.3 TWh of curtailed wind and ratepayers were required to pay for it along with the spilled hydro.  As recently reported Ontario has reduced emissions in the electricity sector by 18 MT (megatonnes) from 2010 to 2019 at a cost to it’s ratepayers and taxpayers of $23.8 billion.

To make matters worse for Ontario ratepayers, surplus power generation is sold in the export market at the Hourly Ontario Energy Price which is well below the contracted costs. Over the 10 years referenced above an average of 18.2 TWh annually were sold to Ontario’s neighbours. The cost to Ontario ratepayers was $12.5 billion.

While the current government of Canada has embraced the goal of achieving “net-zero” greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2050, the obsession, will devastate the Canadian economy no matter what claims are made by the associations of wind, solar and tides generators!

The individuals who provided their dubious non-factual rhetoric to the author of the Globe & Mail article did so for the sole purpose of furthering the financial well-being of members of their associations.  They ignore the further damage to Canada their recommendations would cause. They should not be treated by journalists as they are and must be questioned about their claims and those writing the articles should do proper research.